Sunday, January 15, 2017

Some New Photos and Updates from Bruges Belgium, Paris France, the Countryside of Germany and Scenes From Coastal California

Sometimes I open up my dusty Photo libraries to see if there are any gems in there, some crusty old snapshot that with a little Tender Loving Care or just a change in my perspective, can be turned into something of interest. Here are a few contenders...


Yellow Fields Under Cloud Cover in Luxembourg near the Roman Ruins... Actually, I was standing ON the ruins while shooting this scene, and the view stole my interest. I guess I'll just have to go back again to shoot the ruins :)   - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
Yellow Fields Under Cloud Cover in Luxembourg near the Roman Ruins... Actually, I was standing ON the ruins while shooting this scene, and the view stole my interest. I guess I'll just have to go back again to shoot the ruins :) - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


House on a Canal in Bruges, Belgium - I first saw this 500 to 800 (record keeping was marginal in Medieval times) year old house in the movie In Bruges, and I wanted to see the house and the village ever since. Well worth the trip - John Brody Photography - JohnBrody.com
House on a Canal in Bruges, Belgium - I first saw this 500 to 800 (record keeping was marginal in Medieval times) year old house in the movie In Bruges, and I wanted to see the house and the village ever since. Well worth the trip - John Brody Photography - JohnBrody.com


Pelicans Over Cove at Point Lobos California. I've had several comments on my good timing to get the pelicans in the photo... The truth is, there were so many pelicans out that stormy day, it would have been almost impossible too get an image without them. Fine with me :) - John Brody Photography - JohnBrody.com
Pelicans Over Cove at Point Lobos California. I've had several comments on my good timing to get the pelicans in the photo... The truth is, there were so many pelicans out that stormy day, it would have been almost impossible too get an image without them. Fine with me :)
John Brody Photography - JohnBrody.com


Moonrise Over Pont Neuf Paris France.  When visiting The City of Lights, my days usually begin and end here, my favorite place in Paris. It's a swirl of activity with dozens of cultural greats surrounding it; the Louvre,  the Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame Cathedral, the Seine Riverfront walkways and the D'Orsay Museum to name a few. The list is endless. A wonderful place you must visit. - John Brody Photography
Moonrise Over Pont Neuf Paris France. When visiting The City of Lights, my days usually begin and end here, my favorite place in Paris. It's a swirl of activity with dozens of cultural greats surrounding it; the Louvre, the Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame Cathedral, the Tuileries Gardens and the D'Orsay Museum to name a few. The list is endless. A wonderful place you must visit.
John Brody Photography - JohnBrody.com


The Louvre Museum with the IM Pei designed Pyramid landmark in Paris. An architectural monument as beautiful as the Mona Lisa and the other artwork inside. You need days to explore it all. The statue room is a must see! - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
The Louvre Museum with the IM Pei designed Pyramid landmark in Paris. An architectural monument as beautiful as the Mona Lisa and the other artwork inside. You need days to explore it all. The statue room is a must see! - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Schooners moored At Pont Neuf in Paris - Pont Neuf is a favorite gathering place for young locals on nights and weekends. The first time I saw this place on a Friday night, it was vibrant to say the least. While it's active day and night, I'd never seen it so crowded. I could barely see the cobblestone riverside walkways which were covered by swarms of locals, mostly late teens and twenty-somethings. They sat in circles of friends, sharing wine and just hanging out from sunset to midnight, when the lights go out and the famous City if Lights goes pitch black, the night over. While peaceful and friendly, the mood was very playful and 'alive', a friendly feel to the whole crowd. Even a stranger with a sack of camera gear wandering through their crowd (me) was treated politely. I can't think of anything to compare with it here in the U.S. - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
Schooners moored At Pont Neuf in Paris - Pont Neuf is a favorite gathering place for young locals on nights and weekends. They sit in circles of friends, sharing wine and just hanging out from sunset to late night. The mood was very always playful and vibrant, friendly even to a stranger (me) hauling a sack of camera gear along the riverside. I can't think of anything to compare with it here in the U.S. - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Tulip Trail in Holland - A rainy day at Keukenhof Gardens near Amsterdam. The rain would stop for a few minutes now and then and I'd shoot the rain soaked flower rows and beautiful tree canopy. Miles of tulip trails, lakes and forest - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
Tulip Trail in Holland - A rainy day at Keukenhof Gardens near Amsterdam. The rain would stop for a few minutes now and then and I'd shoot the rain soaked flower rows and beautiful tree canopy. Miles of tulip trails, lakes and forest - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Moonrise Over Pont des Arts Paris - This bridge is never a boring place. During my last trip I saw so many types here; locals and travelers, the friendly and the pick-pockets, painters and musicians. On my last night there, three motley guys pulled out instruments and broke into a blazing version of Sunshine of Your Love followed by a string of well played classics. They then bowed to the crowd and headed off into the night... I can't think of anywhere that would happen in Los Angeles. This footbridge is a very special place... JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
Moonrise Over Pont des Arts Paris - This bridge is never a boring place. During my last trip I saw so many types here; locals and travelers, the friendly and the pick-pockets, painters and musicians. On my last night there, three motley guys pulled out instruments and broke into a blazing version of Sunshine of Your Love followed by a string of well played classics; a wonderful performance. They then bowed to the crowd and headed off into the night... I can't think of anywhere that would happen in Los Angeles. This footbridge is a very special place...
JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Small Village in Belgium or Germany between the Spa Francorchamps and Nurburgring Formula One race tracks. I crossed the border so many times that day it was impossible to know what country I was in... A good day of exploration and race track adrenaline :)   Square Aspect Ratio -  JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
Small Village in Belgium or Germany between the Spa Francorchamps and Nurburgring Formula One race tracks. I crossed the border so many times that day it was impossible to know what country I was in... A good day of exploration and race track adrenaline :) Square Aspect Ratio - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Portraits of Landscapes :) Some Landscape Themes that Begged For a Portrait Treatment - Notre Dame Cathedral, Beautiful Fields in Belgium, Poppies, Pelicans and Central Park at Midnight - Enjoy :) John Brody Photography

cenic Field in Belgium - A June afternoon near the Belgium border with Luxembourg. The canola blossomed were at their peak after the rains. I came here to see/shoot some Roman Ruins, which I was actually standing on when I saw this beautiful scene. I get distracted easily :) JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
Scenic Field in Belgium - A June afternoon near the Belgium/ Luxembourg border. The canola blossom were at their peak after the rains. I came here to see/shoot some Roman Ruins, which I was actually standing on when I saw this beautiful scene. I get distracted easily :)
 JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Notre Dame Cathedral at Dusk Paris at Dusk - The locals gather here every night in little circles on the banks of the Seine to talk, enjoy wine and friendship - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com
Notre Dame Cathedral at Dusk Paris at Dusk - The locals gather here every night in little circles on the banks of the Seine to talk, enjoy wine and friendship - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com


Path to Cemetery on a Hillside Overlooking Dijon France. Many locals gathered every evening  to watch the sunsets over the city below. Gustave Eiffel, the designer of the Eiffel Tower was born in this city  - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
Path to Cemetery on a Hillside Overlooking Dijon France. Many locals gathered every evening to watch the sunsets over the city below. Gustave Eiffel, the designer of the Eiffel Tower was born in this city - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Skyline Reflection of Central Park NYC  by the Plaza and the well known NYC Apple Store. Photo taken from the Gapstow Bridge at the southernmost corner of Central Park near Wollman Ice Skating Rink, yes, the skating rink in almost every movie made in Central Park including Serendipity, Limitless, and Love Story to name a few :)   -   JohnBrody.com / JohnBrody.com Photography
Skyline Reflection of Central Park NYC by the Plaza and the well known NYC Apple Store. Photo taken from the Gapstow Bridge at the southernmost corner of Central Park near Wollman Ice Skating Rink, yes, the skating rink in almost every movie made in Central Park including Serendipity, Limitless, and Love Story to name a few :) - JohnBrody.com / JohnBrody.com


Seagulls in a Storm  -  There were endless formations of seagulls this day at Point Lobos near Carmel California. One after the other they zipped by, all seeming to have important places to be. I don't know if the storm was churning up food for them or what... A beautiful display. - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com
Seagulls in a Storm - There were endless formations of seagulls this day at Point Lobos near Carmel California. One after the other they zipped by, all seeming to have important places to be. I don't know if the storm was churning up food for them or what... A beautiful display. - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com


Flower Cluster by the Local Lake.   Trying a slightly different effect with this photo. Part of a field of flowers by the lake, I shot it at 1/3200th at f2.8 and more distance than usual with a macro lens. Just wanted the crispness in the front blossom and the slow fade of the background. -  John Brody Photography / John Brody
Flower Cluster by the Local Lake. Trying a slightly different effect with this photo. Part of a field of flowers by the lake, I shot it at 1/3200th at f2.8 and more distance than usual with a macro lens. Just wanted the crispness in the front blossom and the slow fade of the background. - John Brody Photography / John Brody


Portrait Version of Point Lobos - A beautiful scene on a stormy day at Point Lobos California. There were so many pelicans that day it was hard to get an image without them, which was fine with me :) The storm seem to make them come alive, probably churning up food sources - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com
Portrait Version of Point Lobos - A beautiful scene on a stormy day at Point Lobos California. There were so many pelicans that day it was hard to get an image without them, which was fine with me :) The storm seem to make them come alive, probably churning up food sources - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com


Tulip Trail in Holland - A rainy day at Keukenhof Gardens near Amsterdam. The rain would stop for a few minutes now and then and I'd shoot the rain soaked flower rows and beautiful tree canopy. Miles of tulip trails, lakes and forest  - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
Tulip Trail in Holland - A rainy day at Keukenhof Gardens near Amsterdam. The rain would stop for a few minutes now and then and I'd shoot the rain soaked flower rows and beautiful tree canopy. Miles of tulip trails, lakes and forest - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography




Tuesday, January 19, 2016

A Great Photo Trip - Paris and a Loop Through Europe
John Brody Photography

The trip was overly ambitious, ridiculously complicated, and as it turned out, perfect. Two weeks in Paris then three weeks driving a loop through Europe, then two more weeks in Paris.  The driving loop went through France to Belgium, Amsterdam, Germany, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Italy, Dijon France then back to Paris. Problems did happen, but even they  turned out to be blessings. For example: No little funky economy sedan at the rental house for our loop through Europe? No problem - we'll give you this fully loaded 5-Series BMW instead at the same price as an apology. No first floor no-view reasonably priced room in Switzerland? Very sorry sir, we'll give you a top floor view room overlooking Lake Lucerne and the Alps for six days... Yes, that really did happen...

I have to say that the BMW fluke gave the trip a whole new dimension. It took us to places and heights that the car we had asked for could never have handled. Beyond that, what were planned as simple visits and tours to a couple of Formula One racetracks became very different events when I found out we could drive the circuits with no speed limits and I had the "Beemer." I have a whole new appreciation for the Nurburgring track in Germany now. M'lady was not be so fond of of the track, but I loved it :) She may not have liked the drive on the tracks, but after 3 weeks and 4,000 miles in the car she's hooked and says her next car will be a BMW...

Paris, as always, was beautiful - the Tuileries Gardens, the Louvre and D'Orsay Museums were their usual artistic treasures. Pont Neuf and Pont des Arts (bridges) were perfect for people watching and just taking in the French culture. Also, coming from L.A. and the 106 degree high temperatures, the cool Paris weather was a welcome relief staying in the seventy-degree range. We also made many forays into the countryside using my favorite trick for finding new places - just drive without watching a map or roadsigns, and intentionally get lost - I find some of my favorite locations that way, like the second image below.

There have been a few previous photo posts here. The photos below are a few new ones - random shots in random locations...

Small village near the Nurburgring Formula 1 Race Track in Germany - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Small village near the Nurburgring Formula 1 Race Track in Germany - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography



Night Photo of the Louvre Museum and Pyramid, Paris France --- JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Night Photo of the Louvre Museum and Pyramid, Paris France --- JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography



Field in Clery-sur-Somme in Northern france - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Field in Clery-sur-Somme in Northern france - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography



A Little Rain Gives Solitude To A Stroller - Pont Neuf Bridge over the River Seine in Paris, an area usually swarming with people - The Umbrella Man - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


The Umbrella Man --- A Little Rain Gives Solitude To A Stroller - Pont Neuf Bridge over the River Seine in Paris, an area usually swarming with people until the rains chase them indoors :)
JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography



https://photos.smugmug.com/Travel/Favorites/i-tf4b4kW/12/M/Bird-At-Pond-in-the-Tuileries-Paris-France-----IM3_7643-M.jpg


The Alpha bird at a pond in the Tuileries, Paris. Caught mid-flight at 1/2000th of a second shutter speed --- JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography



Intense game of chess at Luxemburg Gardens in Paris - Furrowed brows and dead silence. The gent at left won with only 3 seconds left...  JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Intense game of chess at Luxemburg Gardens in Paris - Furrowed brows and dead silence. The gent at left won with only 3 seconds left... JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography



Autumn Colored Leaf by the Pond - Simple shot of a backlit leaf with water droplet bokeh in the background. Big image but a tiny leaf, maybe an inch at most. Portrait Orientation - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com


Autumn Colored Leaf by the Pond - Simple shot of a backlit leaf with water droplet bokeh in the background. Big image but a tiny leaf, maybe an inch at most. Portrait Orientation - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com



Eiffel Tower and Pont Alexandre III at sunset - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Eiffel Tower and Pont Alexandre III at sunset - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography



Friday, October 3, 2014

Moonrise Over Pont Neuf, Paris France - John Brody Photography

Pont Neuf Bridge, my favorite place in Paris, close to Notre Dame Cathedral, Pont des Arts, the Eiffel Tower, the Opera House and hundreds of others - JohnBrody.com / JohnBrody.blogspot.com / John Brody Photography
Pont Neuf Bridge, my favorite place in Paris - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Pont Neuf is my favorite place in Paris and maybe my favorite place on the globe. It's my personal "Heart" of the city, the center around which the rest of the city branches. An architechtural gem, it has been painted by greats like Vincent van Gogh, Renoir, Pissarro and countless others. It's surrounded by the Notre Dame Cathedral, Pont des Arts, the Eiffel Tower, the Opera House and hundreds of other monuments and attractions. It always has something to offer; great views, interesting people, a nice place to relax after a long day of shooting.

--- What most people don't know is Pont Neuf's odd and often deadly history. All through the 1700s, Pont Neuf was the center of Paris, busy with both crime and commerce. Benjamin Franklin wrote to his friends in America that he had not understood the Parisian character until had visited Pont Neuf. Several other writers describe how, even before the bridge was completed in 1607, gangs hid out under and around it and robbed and murdered people. It remained a dangerous place even as it became busier. For a long time, the bridge even had its own gallows for instant justice. This didn't keep people from gathering there, drawn by various street performers, acrobats, fire-eaters, musicians, etc., (much as they still do when I visit now). Prostitutes, pickpockets, and scam artists were ever present. There were respected tooth pullers, sellers of glass eyes and stones to beautify the face, wrinkle removers, wooden leg salesmen, news-vendors, jugglers, showmen, loungers, and thieves... I didn't mean for this to sound like a history lesson, I just find it all quite interesting. If you haven't been there, you must visit if you get a chance...

Per request, some basics... Called Pont Neuf (meaning New Bridge) during construction, the name stuck. Construction started in 1578. It's length is 781 feet or 238 meters. The Architect was Androuet du Cerceau....... Also per request I'm adding photo data: Canon 5D Mark II, Shutter 1.6 seconds, Aperture 9.0, ISO 1600, Focal Length 68mm. Cheers. --- John Brody Photography

Sunday, July 6, 2014

Monterey Marina in Midnight Fog - John Brody Photography

A beautiful Marina in Monterey California. At the end of Cannery Row it's an integral part of area portrayed by John Steinbeck in his novel by the same name. Below is the first paragraph of wonderful short novel, a favorite of mine... JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
A beautiful Marina at the end of Cannery Row in Monterey California. JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


A beautiful Marina in Monterey California. At the end of Cannery Row it's an integral part of area portrayed by John Steinbeck in his novel by the same name. Below is the first paragraph of the wonderful short novel, a favorite of mine...

"Cannery Row in Monterey in California is a poem, a stink, a grating noise, a quality of light, a tone, a habit, a nostalgia, a dream. Cannery Row is the gathered and scattered, tin and iron and rust and splintered wood, chipped pavement and weedy lots and junk heaps, sardine canneries of corrugated iron, honky tonks, restaurants and whore houses, and little crowded groceries, and laboratories and flophouses. Its inhabitant are, as the man once said, 'whores, pimps, gambler and sons of bitches,' by which he meant Everybody. Had the man looked through another peephole he might have said, 'Saints and angels and martyrs and holymen' and he would have meant the same thing"

I spent many nights in this type of drizzly fog during the two years I spent in Monterey, one of the more beautiful places I've lived. Photo by John Brody Photography

Friday, March 21, 2014

Ballet Dancer in a Backstage Setting - John Brody Photography

I often find that some of my favorite photos from a trip are scenes that I had no idea I'd be shooting; a kid playing on a swing with her grandfather, a chess match in the Luxembourg Gardens, and in this case, an idyllic scene of a ballet dancer in a pre-performance setting. Maybe I'm biased, but I get a good feeling from the scene...

Reflection photo of display of living and still life in Paris. Live model with 3D fixtures and print backgrounds. - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography - Part of photographic arts series of Paris photos,
Ballet Dancer backstage - Reflection on photo of living and still life mix in France. National Ballet Pre-Performance setting - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Walt Disney Concert Hall - A Frank Gehry Masterpiece - John Brody Photography

The Walt Disney Concert Hall, A Frank Gehry Masterpiece - Home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra and one of the most beautiful modern buildings I have ever been in. I found out after I got home that the unusual cloud formation was due to brush fires in the nearby drought singed hills - A beautiful scene from an unfortunate cause. John Brody Photography - JohnBrody.com

Click Image for Hi-Res
Walt Disney Concert Hall - A Frank Gehry Masterpiece - John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com / JohnBrody.blogspot.com
Walt Disney Concert Hall - A Frank Gehry Masterpiece - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Night Photo - Louvre and the IM Pei Pyramid
John Brody Photography

I've come to enjoy the grounds of the Louvre Museum and the adjoining Tuileries almost as much as the Artwork inside. Many nights I'd buy dinner and bring it to the steps in front of the museum, and I'd find myself surrounded by dozen of circles of locals doing the same. Great place to watch the sun disappear and the Museum lights come to life.

Night Photo of the Louvre Palace and Musee d Art and the Louvre Pyramid. Photo taken from The Tuileries Jardin - Post includes Images of Pont Alexandre III - Eiffel Tower - The Tuileries Jardin and Other Musee d Art - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
The Louvre Palace and Musee d Art and the Louvre Pyramid. Photo taken from The Tuileries Jardin - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography

Monday, September 9, 2013

Sacre Coeurs Basilica on Montmartre Hill through d'Orsay Museum Clock
John Brody Photography

The Museum d'Orsay is one of my favorite places in Paris. Unfortunately, they've changed their policy and cameras are no longer allowed inside the art display rooms. Very unfortunate, because I always used to shoot my favorites by Vincent van Gogh, Degas, Pissarro, Monet, Miller, Bouguereau and many others... The good news is that you can still use your cameras on the balconies and a few other areas in the museum. This may not seem like much, but the vantage points from the d'Orsay balconies and other areas let you take photos of the Louvre and the Tuileries gardens that you can't get from anywhere else. The photo below of the Sacre Coeur Basilica seen through the d"Orsay clock was shot from the cafe inside the museum.

The Museum d'Orsay now has the policy that no cameras are allowed inside the art display rooms. Very unfortunate because I always used to shoot the works by Vincent van Gogh, Degas, Pissarro, Monet, Miller, Bouguereau and many others... The good news is, you can still use your cameras on the balconies and a few other areas. The Sacre Coeur through the d
Sacre Coeurs and Montmartre hill shot through the d'Orsay Museum Clock - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography

Sunday, September 8, 2013

Vincent Van Gogh - Biography and Facts About Vincent van Gogh
John Brody Photography

Letter From Vincent's Brother Theo to his fiancé Jo Bonger - 1889:
"That head of his has been occupied with contemporary society's insoluble problems for so long, and he is still battling on with his good-heartedness and boundless energy. His efforts have not been in vain, but he will probably not live to see them come to fruition, for by the time people understand what he is saying in his paintings it will be too late. He is one of the most advanced painters and it is difficult to understand him, even for me who knows him so intimately. His ideas cover so much ground, examining what is humane and how one should look at the world, that one must first free oneself from anything remotely linked to convention to understand what he was trying to say, but I am sure he will be understood later on. It is just hard to say when."

Starry
Starry Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh - Travel photo by John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com / John Brody - Click image for Hi-Res Version



Vincent Van Gogh Biography

Vincent Willem Van Gogh was born on March 30, 1853, in Groot-Zundert, a village in the south of the Netherlands, on the Belgian border. He was the eldest son of Theodorus Van Gogh, a handsome preacher, and his kind-hearted wife, Anna Cornelia Carbentus. He was named Vincent Willem after his two grandfathers. He was followed by a sister, Anna, born in 1855, and in 1857, his brother, Theodorus (Theo), was born.


Vincent van Gogh at 18 Years Old - John Brody Photography - Click for A Full Album Of Vincent van Gogh Images and Hi-Res Starry Night Desktop Wallpaper<br />- Bio Summary by John BrodyVincent and Theo were both copper-haired and blue-eyed, although the younger Theo was of slighter build. Over time, two more daughters and another son were added to the family. Vincent's father was known as the "handsome preacher" in the village. His congregation was small and provided a meager living for the Van Gogh family. Although money was tight, Vincent and Theo formed a bond that would last their entire lives. They kept each other company and spent their days among the wheat fields, the heath and the pine forests.

Vincent attended the village school until his parents, worried that the peasant children might make their son rough, hired a governess to teach their children at home. Vincent was only eleven when his parents sent him to boarding school. The separation from home made a deep impression on Vincent and was the beginning of a life lived in loneliness and isolation.

Eventually, at age 16, like many young men of his time, his parents decided that he'd had enough schooling and Vincent was apprenticed to learn a trade. Three of his uncles owned successful art galleries. Vincent was apprenticed to the most successful, Uncle Cent (Vincent) and began work in The Hague branch of Goupil, Cie.

After Vincent had been in The Hague three years, his brother Theo came to visit him. A brief note, thanking Theo for visiting, is the first surviving letter from Vincent Van Gogh to his brother. The letter is dated August 18, 1872.

Theo van Gogh at 32 Years Old - John Brody Photography - Click for A Full Album Of Vincent van Gogh Images - Bio Summary by John BrodyMy dear Theo,

Many thanks for your letter, I was glad you arrived back safely. I missed you the first few days, it felt strange not to find you there when I came home in the afternoons.

We have had some enjoyable days together, and managed to take a few walks, see one or two sights between the spots of rain.

What terrible weather. You must have sweltered on your walks to Oisterwijk. There was harness racing yesterday for the exhibition, but the illuminations, the fireworks were put off because of the bad weather, so it's just as well you didn't stay on to see them. Regards from the Haanebeck Roos families.

Always your loving Vincent (First surviving letter is dated August 18, 1872)


Vincent Van Gogh was doing well in his work at the art gallery when his brother, Theo, also began his apprenticeship with the firm. The director wrote to the Van Goghs expressing his confidence in Vincent and notifying them that he was to be transferred to the London office as a promotion. He noted that both the clients and painters enjoyed dealing with Vincent and expected him to have success.


Noon

Noon Rest by Vincent van Gogh - Travel photo by John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com / John Brody - Click image for Hi-Res Version


Vincent developed an affection for the daughter of the landlady of his boarding house, Eugenie. Eugenie was slim, dark-haired and charming. She was also engaged to be married. Shy, twenty-years-old with no experience with women, Vincent was brokenhearted. There was a sudden, dramatic change in Vincent's personality after this rejection. He turned silent, moody and difficult, and refused to go out. For the first time, people called him "eccentric".

Two years later, Goupil transferred Vincent to Paris, hoping the change of scenery would improve his outlook. Vincent did spend time in the Louvre and the Luxembourg Palace, but was not attracted to the lively Parisian nightlife. He began to attend church regularly, for the first time since he'd left his father's parish. Van Gogh began to read the Bible in all his spare time. He seemed to his family to be bordering on the fanatic. He even suggested to Theo that he burn all his books except his Bible.

Eventually, Goupil's art gallery had enough of Van Gogh's frequent absences, his rude treatment of clients and his strange choices in clothing. He was fired.

Van Gogh managed to land a job teaching young boys at a London boarding school for room and board. And then moved to another similar teaching job where he was given room and board plus a small salary. More interesting to Vincent, however, was the fact that in this second teaching job, he was allowed to preach. His letters home were full of religious aphorisms and meditations. His father didn't have any objection to his son becoming a preacher, but he wanted him to start the necessary studies rather than dabbling in such an unpractical way.

Mulberry

Mulberry Tree by Vincent van Gogh - Click image for Hi-Res Version

In the spring of 1889 van Gogh committed himself to an asylum at Saint-Rémy.
During his lucid periods, between periodic attacks of what seems to have been epilepsy,
 he was constantly working, creating dazzling compositions of vigorous brushwork and
 energetic spontaneity. This painting was of particular interest to van Gogh, who wrote
about it three times in letters to his brother and sister, commenting that he believed it
was the best of his mulberry tree paintings.

- Photo by John Brody Photography- Norton Simon Museum -



When Van Gogh returned home that Christmas, Vincent's sister Elizabeth found him "groggy with piety." At the age of twenty-four, Vincent announced his intention to become a clergyman. In order to become a pastor in the Dutch Reformed Church, Vincent would need to pass state entrance exams. Because he lacked a high-school diploma, this would mean at least two years of tutoring. Then, once he passed the exams, he would have to train for six expensive years at the theological seminary in Amsterdam. Without all this, Vincent would be unable to acquire a meaningful job in the church. The whole extended Van Gogh family pitched in to help Vincent with room and board and tutoring.

Vincent didn't enjoy his studies. He began to feel constantly anxious. He felt he was letting down his family. He began to punish himself by beating his back with a rope. Sometimes he locked himself out of his uncle's house and slept in the cold shed without even a blanket. After a year of struggling, Vincent gave up. He would never pass the entrance exams. As a compromise, Vincent and his father enrolled him in an evangelical course that took three years instead of six. Vincent was accepted on a trial basis. After six months, realizing even this trial was a failure, Vincent landed an assignment as an evangelist and left for the grim mining district in southwestern Belgium called the Borinage.

Vincent began trying to identify with the miners. He moved into a hovel where he slept on a straw mattress. He gave his warm clothes to the needy and stopped washing the coal dust from his face. Vincent's determination to follow Christ's example made people uncomfortable. The mission sponsors refused to renew his appointment. This began a period of time when Vincent was homeless and hungry. He lost touch with his family, refusing to write even to Theo for nine months.

Field

Field with Ploughman (Plow Man) by Vincent van Gogh - Travel photo by John Brody Photography
Click image for Hi-Res Version


During the summer of 1879, Vincent wrote to his first boss at Goupil to request some watercolors, a sketchbook and two manuals on learning how to draw. Vincent began trying to sketch the miners and peasants. He made slow progress, but persisted. Eventually, hungry, tired, and desperate, he went home.

His earlier desire to help his fellow man as a clergyman gradually developed into an urge (as he later wrote) to leave "some memento in the form of drawings or paintings—not made to please any particular movement, but to express a sincere human feeling." His parents, however, did not support this plan and financial responsibility for Vincent passed to his brother, Theo. Throughout Van Gogh's life, Theo provided material and emotional support. Finally, Van Gogh came to regard his work as a kind of a collaboration with Theo, based on the support and kindness Theo offered him.

When Vincent van Gogh decided to become an artist, no one, not even Vincent himself, suspected that he had extraordinary gifts. He progressed rapidly from inept novice to a truly original master. His work was eventually characterized by bold, harmonious colors and simple but memorable compositions.

Van Gogh went to Brussels to study at the academy to prepare for his new career. He left after only nine months. In April, 1881, he went to live with his parents and taught himself how to draw. Extracts from two letters at this time below:

I think all the fellows in the drawing class all work badly and in an absolutely wrong way... it is correct, it is whatever you like, but it is dead." --- Letter to Theo

I still remember telling you... that I would sooner be with a bad whore than be alone." --- Letter to Theo


Vincent van Gogh - John Brody Photography - Click for Larger Image - Bio Summary by John Brody
Olive Trees by Vincent van Gogh - Travel photo by John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com
  Click image for Hi-Res Version



THE HAGUE

Van Gogh moved to The Hague to learn drawing from his cousin, Anton Mauve. However, in addition to Van Gogh's prickly personality, Mauve and the rest of Vincent's family disapproved of Vincent's relationship with Sien Hoornik, a prostitute pregnant with her second illigitimate child. For Van Gogh, this was a brief idyllic period, when he had a little family and access to a live model. Eventually, Van Gogh broke off the relationship with Sien and ended up living with his parents again, this time in Nuenen.


In Nuenen, Van Gogh began painting in the style of one of the artists he most admired, Jean-Francois Millet. Millet was famous at the time for his scenes of the harsh life of peasants and this theme struck a resonant chord with Vincent. Van Gogh painted and drew a major series of heads and peasant hands in preparation for The Potato Eaters, which he completed in 1884. It took Van Gogh a while to convince the peasants to pose for him as they worked, they wanted to wear their best and sit stiffly for portraits. Not too long after, however, a rumor that Van Gogh had fathered a peasant girl's illegitimate child caused the local priest to forbid his parishioners to pose for Vincent. Undaunted, Van Gogh turned to landscapes instead.

In 1885, Van Gogh decided he would try formal schooling again and enrolled at the academy in Antwerp. He revelled in the museums but found the lessons tedious. It was here that he discovered the work of Rubens and also discovered Japanese prints.



Van Gogh went to live with Theo in 1886 in Paris. He was at last confronted with the full impact of modern art and the work of contemporary painters, both Impressionists and post-Impressionists.

Impressed with the brighter palette of the Impressionists he continued to experiment with Impressionist styles, post-Impressionist, and Japanese-influenced painting. By the end of the two years spent in Paris, Vincent van Gogh had forged his own highly personal style.

ARLES

In early 1888 Van Gogh moved south to Arles, in Provence. He was attracted to the area because he believed the stronger light would enable him to paint more truthfully. His hope was to create a working community of artists who would revolutionize color.

Van Gogh was enchanted by the landscape around Arles and began to make a personal contribution to modern art with his daring, exaggerated color combinations. It was typical of his confidence in his work that Van Gogh chose not to try to sell any work until he had thirty top-class pictures with which to announce himself to the world.

His ambition for an artist's colony seemed to take a promising turn when Gauguin arrived to live with him in October 1888. By the end of the year, however, his hopes were shattered when the first signs of his illness appeared. Diagnosed as a kind of epilepsy, it was characterized by delusions and psychotic attacks. During these episodes, Van Gogh ate paint or dirt. He saw things. It was during one of these seizures that Van Gogh cut off his earlobe. Gauguin quickly moved out.



Vincent van Gogh - John Brody Photography - Click for Larger Image - Bio Summary by John Brody
Irises in a Vase by Vincent van Gogh - Travel photo by John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com
Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art NYC by John Brody
  Click image for Hi-Res Version


SAINT-RÉMY

Van Gogh, hounded by the villagers in Arles for his illness, decided to move to nearby Saint-Rémy and check himself into the asylum as a voluntary patient. Thanks once more to Theo's continued support, the asylum wasn't so bad. Vincent had a bedroom and a room for a studio. The only treatment was "hydrotherapy" which consisted of two-hour long baths twice a week. When Vincent wasn't suffering from his illness, he was clear-headed and able to work on his art.

His use of intense color became more muted and his brushwork began to resemble the hatchings and scorings of graphic work. He had the beginnings of professional recognition here when two of his painitngs were shown at the fifth exhibition of the Société des artistes indépendants.

Van Gogh made a large number of "translations in color" of prints by his favorite artists. These paintings were both good practice for Van Gogh and were consoling. In January of 1890, Van Gogh's first critical acclaim was published in an article by Albert Aurier who praised Van Gogh's work.


Thatched Cottages by Vincent van Gogh - John Brody Photography - Click for Larger Image - Bio Summary by John Brody via Wikipedia
Thatched Cottages by Vincent van Gogh - Travel photo by John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com
Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art NYC by John Brody
  Click image for Hi-Res Version


AUVERS-SUR-OISE

Van Gogh left the asylum in May 1890 for the village of Auvers-sur-Oise, near Paris. He stopped for a few days to visit his brother, Theo, his wife Joanna, and their infant son, Vincent Willem Van Gogh.

Van Gogh was only in Auvers for two months, but he produced around eighty paintings. But the burden of living had become too great to bear. On July 27, 1890, he shot himself in the chest. Two days later, he died of an infection caused by the bullet which hadn't been removed.

Van Gogh's funeral was attended by many of his artist friends and supporters—including Bernard, Laval, Lucien Pissarro and Père Tanguy. Bernard described how the coffin had been covered with yellow flowers "his favourite color ... a symbol of the light of which he dreamed both in his heart and in his work." Van Gogh was buried in a sunny spot among the wheat fields. Theo was heartbroken. A month later, he became ill and six months later, Theo died.

From that point on, Theo's young widow, Johanna van Gogh-Bonger became the champion and hero of Vincent's life. She returned to Holland with the collection of Van Gogh's art, which had been left to Theo, and dedicated herself to getting the recognition that Vincent van Gogh deserved.

Johanna wisely held Vincent's letters back from the public. She insisted on first having Van Gogh's stature as a master of modern art established. Finally, in 1914, she published the correspondence between the two brothers.


Final note from John: The photo below is one of my favorite works of van Gogh's. I was able to visit this site and was amazed that absolutely nothing had changed - The stairway was still there, the walls, the houses, the windows, everything. Other that a few repaired roofs and tree growth as will happen in 125 years, it was all the same. Standing in the same spot where VVG had to have been standing when it was painted, it was a strange and sad feeling since 20 feet to my right was the attic bedroom where Vincent last lived and also died. Walking to the right of the stairway and up a winding small town hillside road, you reach another location full of mixed feelings. It's the field where Wheatfield with Crows was painted, and also the field where, if the storied I read and also heard from the townsfolk were true, the field where he shot himself. He is buried next to his brother Theo in a peaceful countryside graveyard next to the wheat field. The end of a brief but memorable life.

Vincent van Gogh - John Brody Photography - Click for Larger Image - Bio Summary by John Brody
Stairway at Auvers by Vincent van Gogh - Travel photo by John Brody Photography / JohnBrody.com
Photographed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art NYC by John Brody
  Click image for Hi-Res Version and more van Gogh works.


Note on source of biography components: The text is largely from a Wikipedia article as of 2010. Most of the images were taken by me (the D'Orsay in Paris a primary source, also the Getty L.A., the Met in NYC, and the Norton Simon) The few that weren't my photos were downloaded from museums, the Vincent van Gogh museum in Amsterdam a primary source. None of the images are to be used for commercial purposes or resale. This is for interest or information only.


Thursday, August 22, 2013

San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge - Night and Day Long Exposures
John Brody Photography


San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge and Sausalito Long Exposure Photography - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge and Sausalito Long Exposure Photography - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography

I never quite understood the old quote often attributed to Mark Twain, “The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco,” until the night I took these photos...

A few hours after sunset on a warmish mid-July night, I showed up at the recommended hillside overlooking the bridge with my camera gear and tripod, dressed in a toasty flannel shirt that was way too warm for the night. In fact, after the little hike to the hillside, I was flat out hot, uncomfortably so. I mumble-cursed Mr. Twain for obviously writing for effect instead of accuracy.

Three hours later I was begging his forgiveness. The temperature had dropped impossibly while the sea breeze had turned into sea blasts that brought an icy chill at unbelievable force. It literally flapped my shirt so hard that it unbuttoned itself and was snapping like a flag at 90 degrees. The shirt issue became a non-issue because I was hanging on to my not-inexpensive camera gear with both hands and still lost a lens cap and a few lens cushions that got sucked out of my camera bag - gone. The tripod stood no chance and was being blown over even with fully spread legs and a 20+ pound camera bag hanging on it for stabilizing weight - It didn't matter. The whole rig would blow over and head for the ground the second I let go of it.

Another battered photographer and I teamed up to deal with the mess. We had the brilliant idea of lashing the tripods to a sturdy post we found but felt fools for thinking there was any twine or cord for miles... His sweet petite girlfriend overheard us, reached in her purse and pulled out a 50 foot spool of yellow and black twisty 1/4 inch nylon rope, still on the spool. He and I looked at each other with puzzled amazement, but a heavy blast of frigid air made us forget about wondering why she had 50 feet of rope in her purse and what the hell else might be in there...

Well, I'll try to wrap up this one sentence description that went totally out of control... The other gent and I secured our cameras, trading off blocking the wind with found cardboard - we each shot a hundred or so photos, shook hands and got the hell out of there. To this day, I still wonder what else was in that purse…

I probably should just delete the little remembrance above, but I doubt anyone will read this anyway :) - If they do, maybe it will serve as a cautionary tale if they're as clueless as I was. Read the brief excerpt from Wikipedia below the photo - If I only knew that tidbit of info before I headed out that night.

San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge and Sausalito Long Exposure Photography - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography
San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge Long Exposure Photography - JohnBrody.com / John Brody Photography


Wikipedia Excerpt: "The Headlands just north of the Golden Gate Bridge ....... create strong gusty Pacific winds which prevent dense forests from forming. The many gaps, ridges, and valleys in the hills increase the wind speed and periodically ..... these winds can reach hurricane force. In summer, breezes can still be very gusty, when the oceanic air and fog cross the hills.




YouTube video for fellow curious types - An Excellent old 2 part video with footage from the 1930's on the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge. It shows the work in progress and excellent visuals on the height, weight, length and all other aspects of the project and the finished Bridge.






Part 2



Tuesday, February 12, 2013

French Beauty at the Louvre Museum in Paris
John Brody Photography

This girl was an absolute French Doll. Surprisingly shy, I snapped off a few in our mini photoshoot before the inevitable happened - A crowd gathered, she turned red in the face, laughed and then hid behind me - very shy. At that point, nobody was looking at Venus de Milo, just her. – Paris, France - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com - Click for full sized Hi-Res Image - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com
Hover over photo for details - JohnBrody.com / JohnBrodyPhotography

No Hottie Comments Please! This girl was an absolute French Doll. I met her when we were both looking at the Venus de Milo statue in the louvre. After a little talking with her and her english speaking friends, I asked if I could take a few photos we could share and she said yes. Surprisingly shy, I snapped off a few in our mini photoshoot before the inevitable happened - A crowd gathered, she turned red in the face, laughed and then hid behind me - very shy. At that point, nobody was looking at Venus de Milo, just her.  Paris, France - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com

Saturday, December 8, 2012

Moonrise Over Bridge of the Arts
John Brody Photography

Pont des Arts, The Bridge With Locks On It - The trend of using lovelocks as a sign of a couples everlasting love seems here to stay. They put their engraved of painted locks on the bridge and throw the key into the Seine River below.
 Moonrise Over Pont des Arts - The Bridge with the Locks on it

Rain Gives Solitude to a Pont Neuf Stroller
John Brody Photography

A Little Rain Gives Solitude To A Stroller - At Pont Beuf Bridge, an area usually swarming with people, on the Banks of the River Seine in Paris, France - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com

A Little Rain Gives Solitude To A Stroller - At Pont Neuf Bridge, an area usually swarming with people.

After snapping this photo, I went over and talked to the gentleman for a few minutes. He told me that he preferred to take his walks in the rain because the crowds disappear and the air is rain washed and pleasant. He gave me his information and a I sent him a copy of the image after I got home. The photo makes me want to go back again...

Photo in Paris, France by John Brody Photography. Hi-Resolution version at JohnBrody.com

Friday, December 7, 2012

A Young Girl Plays on Swing in Paris
John Brody Photography


A Young Girl Plays on Swing in Tuileries Garden Paris - JohnBrody.com , France - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com

A young girl playing on a swingset in the Tuileries Garden Paris with an occasional helpful push from her grandfather. A very simple image, it's one of my favorites....

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Photos From Pont Neuf in the The Heart of Paris
John Brody Photography


Pont Neuf Bridge in Paris. - JohnBrody.com
Pont Neuf or The New Bridge ... It's not too new though since construction of the original bridge was
completed in 1607 - This is my favorite place in the city.

Young Girl on Father's Shoulders Watches Play in The Jardin du Luxembourg, or the Luxembourg Gardens, Paris - JohnBrody.com
Young girl on her father's shoulders is riveted by a play being performed
in the Jardin du Luxembourg, or the Luxembourg Gardens in Paris.

The Pont des Arts and the Eiffel Tower at Midnight in Paris - Image taken from Pont Neuf Bridge - JohnBrody.com
Simple night shot of the Seine River, Pont des Arts and the Eiffel Tower. The river comes alive at night.

Girl On The Pont Neuf Looks Over The Seine at the Louvre and Pont des Arts, Paris - JohnBrody.com
She seemed to stop here every day and just soak up the ambiance. In front
of her, of course, is the Louvre, the Seine, bridges, monuments, etc.

Riverside Walkway at Pont Neuf Bridge Paris - After the Rain - JohnBrody.com
The double masted schooner in the foreground is always docked here... It begs the question, where can
it go and where did it come from. With 20 meter masts, it sure didn't get here under sail but it's always
here when I visit.


Sunday, November 7, 2010

Sacre Coeurs Photograph From Nearby Hi-Rise Rooftop - Finally, An Eye Level View...

Sacre Coeurs shot from a nearby Hi-Rise rooftop - Finally, and eye level view... JohnBrody.com - John Brody PhotographyI met a great French woman on the subway on the day I was heading up to Montmartre to shoot Sacre Coeur Basilica. We hit it off and talked about photography and her work as a clothing designer. When we got to the street level above the stop near Sacre Couers, she was trying to tell me something, but with her moderate English and my zero French, I couldn't understand. I finally waved, smiled and started to walk away. She literally grabbed me by my sleeve and dragged me in a direction away from my destination - I, of course, gave in and followed... she obviously knew something I didn't.

A couple blocks and a few elevators later, she walked me though her office space and out on to a rooftop patio that had a stunning 180 degree view, the centerpiece being Sacre Coeur directly in front of me. She saw my thrilled look, gave me a hug, waved me out onto the patio and disappeared to get on with running her business. A couple hours and a couple hundred photos later I found her, thanks her hugely and got another hug... Whoever started that rumor that the french are rude and arrogant experienced a different France than I did. Kindness like this lady's is common and I had nothing but good experiences.

One warning about Sacre Coeur... Don't go there on weekends or holidays. On weekends ALL streets near Sacre Coeur look like the photo below, so adjust your schedule accordingly.

On weekends ALL streets near Sacre Coeur look like this... Adjust your schedule accordingly - John Brody.com - John Brody Photography - Click for Larger Image

A bit of Sacre Coeur history:
Montmartre is a hill which is 130 meters high, giving its name to the surrounding district, in the north of Paris in the 18th arrondissement, a part of the Right Bank. Montmartre is primarily known for the white-domed Basilica of the Sacre Coeur on its summit and as a nightclub district. The other, older, church on the hill is Saint Pierre de Montmartre, which claims to be the location at which the Jesuit order of priests was founded. Many artists had studios or worked around the community of Montmartre such as Salvador Dalí, Amedeo Modigliani, Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso and Vincent van Gogh. Montmartre is also the setting for several hit films.

Sacre Coeur, the full name being The Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Jesus of Paris, is a Roman Catholic church and minor basilica, dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Paris, France. An extremely popular landmark (see my crowd photo above for proof of this), the basilica is located at the summit of the butte Montmartre, the highest point in the city. The view is beautiful from the top, but it's not for the weak of leg or large in size - I could barely force my way through some of the stairways during my ascent.

  • --- Click for Full Size Photos for Linking or Print at JohnBrody.com ---


  • Not Photoshop - Glass Cover on Art Gallery Chopin Painting Reflected Paris Street and Archtecture

    Glass Cover on Art Gallery Chopin Painting Reflected Paris Street and Archtecture - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com

    A real simple shot I couldn't pass up - Walking by a painting of Chopin by Delecroix I notice the reflection of the buildings and the classic Paris architecture. When I focused my camera on the reflection instead of the painting, the street scene became dominant and Chopin faded into a transluscent image that seemed to be watching over his chosen new city. Just a change of look from a straight photo... JohnBrody.com




  • --- Click Here for Full Size Photos for Linking or Print at JohnBrody.com ---


  • A Twilight View And Some Interesting Facts on the Eiffel Tower ... John Brody Photography at JohnBrody.com

    Eiffel Tower Paris - A Twilight View of the Classic Landmark... - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com

    Every time I see the picture of Hitler below, it puts a knot in my stomach, but it's a reality, and a piece of history so I include it as such... Again, Wikipedia "Upon the German occupation of Paris in 1940, the lift cables were cut by the French so that Adolf Hitler would have to climb the steps to the summit. When visiting Hitler in Paris 1940 - Click for Larger Image and GalleriesParis, Hitler chose to stay on the ground. A Frenchman scaled the tower during the German occupation to hang the French flag. In August 1944, when the Allies were nearing Paris, Hitler ordered General Dietrich von Choltitz, the military governor of Paris, to demolish the tower along with the rest of the city. Von Choltitz disobeyed the order. Some say Hitler was later persuaded to keep the tower intact so it could later be used for communications. The lifts of the Tower were working normally within hours of the Liberation of Paris."

    A bit more Wikipedia info I found interesting: The Eiffel Tower is a 1889  tower located on the Champ de Mars in Paris that has become global icon of France and one of the most recognizable structures in the world. The tallest building in Paris, it is the most-visited paid monument in the world; millions of people  per year. Named for its designer, engineer Gustave Eiffel, the tower was built in 1887 to 1889 as the entrance arch to the 1889 World's Fair marking the centennial celebration of the French Revolution.

    The tower stands 324 metres (1,063 ft) tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building and it surpassed the Washington Monument to assume the title of tallest man-made structure in the world, a title it held for 41 years, until the Chrysler Building in New York City was built in 1930. The tower has become the most prominent symbol of both Paris and France, often in the establishing shot of films set in the city.

    The photo of Hitler in front of the Eiffel Tower is from the National Archives and is a public domain image. The photo at top is by me, John Brody Photography :-)



    Saturday, September 11, 2010

    Riverfront Walkway Again Vacant From Rain

    A Little Rain And The Crowds Disappear - At Pont Neuf Bridge, an area usually swarming with people, on the Banks of the River Seine in Paris, France - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com

    As noted in the prior 'Umbrella Man' photo post, the rain causes a transformation of the area. From a cacophony of noise and a swarm of people to a quiet and empty architectural display, the change is sudden and complete. As many know, this is the bridge wrapped in fabric by Christo and Jeane Claude.

    Saturday, July 24, 2010

    Louvre Moonrise at 4am - Obviously, in Paris France - JohnBrody.com

    Louvre Moonrise at 4am - Obviously, in Paris France - JohnBrody.com - Click for full sized Hi-Res Image - JohnBrody.com -  JohnBrody.blogspot.com

    Moonrise over the Louvre at 4am in the morning. One thing they don't mention is that there are NO available taxis at 4am. I waited for a half hour and then picked up my monster tripod and 35 pound gearbag and started walking, and I'd already been shooting for 18 hours - An hour and 3 miles later I was at my hotel. Not fun, so plan ahead - Click for full sized Hi-Res Image - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com

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  • Friday, July 2, 2010

    Brugges Belgium - A typical canal scene - A Photograpers delight - JohnBrody.com

    Brugges Belgium - A typical canal in the quaint little town. There are hundred of places where you can try to get a good clean shot. Read about tourist boats below - Click for full sized Hi-Res Image - JohnBrody.com -  JohnBrody.blogspot.com

    There are hundred of places where you can try to get a good clean shot - This image probably took me fifty tries to capture it. Boats were the biggest problem. As soon as the waves settled down, another boat full of tourists would come around the corner... Patience Required! - Click for full sized Hi-Res Image - JohnBrody.com - JohnBrody.blogspot.com

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  • Wednesday, June 30, 2010

    A Puddle In Paris - Reflected Eiffel Tower - JohnBrody.com

    The Eiffel Tower Hiding in a Paris Puddle Under the Tower - Click for full sized Hi-Res Image - JohnBrody.com -  JohnBrody.blogspot.com

    I spotted a lot of little ponds and storefront windows that had interesting reflections - Sometimes the mix of the reflection and what was also in the window made the shot interesting. Like the Chanel window display reflecting the Ritz Hotel, or a Ferarri window reflecting the Arch de Triumph... Many possibilities... John Brody.com

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  • Saturday, June 26, 2010

    Notre Dame at Dusk - Paris, France - JohnBrody.com

    Notre Dame Cathedral Near Sunset in Paris France - Click for full sized Hi-Res Image - JohnBrody.com -  JohnBrody.blogspot.com

    We all know a tidbit of info on Notre Dame. I read a few articles out of my own curiosity and put a very short summary below. It's a lot more than I knew before in a couple paragraphs. I'm learning too...

    Notre Dame de Paris (French for Our Lady of Paris), also known as Notre Dame Cathedral, is a Gothic, Roman Catholic cathedral in the fourth arrondissement of Paris, France. It's the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Paris, in other words, it's the church that contains the cathedra (official chair), of the Archbishop of Paris. Notre Dame de Paris is widely considered one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture in France and Europe. Notre Dame de Paris was one of the first Gothic cathedrals, and its construction spanned the Gothic period. It's sculptures and stained glass show the heavy influence of naturalism, unlike that of earlier Romanesque architecture.

    Notre Dame de Paris was among the first buildings in the world to use the flying buttress (arched exterior supports). The building was not originally designed to include the flying buttresses around the choir and nave. After the construction began and the thinner walls (popularized in the Gothic style) grew ever higher, stress fractures began to occur as the walls pushed outward. The flying buttresses took on a new importance and now surround the cathedral.

    The cathedral suffered extensive damage in the French Revolution in the 1790s - much of its religious imagery was damaged or destroyed. During the 1800s, it was restored, returning the cathedral to its previous state.

    I could add volumes, but this is a photo blog, so I'll stop here. We've all heard of that Google thing if we need more :)

    - JohnBrody.com

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  • Intense Chess Game - Jardin du Luxembourg (Luxemburg Garden), Paris - JohnBrody.com

    Intense Chess Game - Jardin du Luxembourg - Luxemburg Garden, Paris. These matches are quite serious with all brows furrowed and complete silence - Click for full sized Hi-Res Image - JohnBrody.com -  JohnBrody.blogspot.com

    Intense game of chess at The Jardin du Luxembourg (Luxemburg Garden) in Paris. These matches are quite serious with all brows furrowed and complete silence. My cameras shutter sounded like a firecracker to me... The gent on the left looked in hopeless shape when he got down to 6 seconds, his opponent having more than a minute. Three moves later with only 1 second left, the man at left was victorious. A six minute game of chess... It takes me that long for one move sometimes. These guys were impressive - JohnBrody.com

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